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Aberfan and Senghenydd: Two Welsh Disasters that Shocked the World

Jese Leos
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Published in Aberfan And Senghenydd Jason Whittle
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Aberfan

On October 21, 1966, a colliery spoil tip collapsed onto Pantglas Junior School in the village of Aberfan, South Wales. The tip, which contained over 150,000 tons of coal waste, had been built on a weak foundation and had been undermined by water seepage. The collapse triggered a massive landslide that engulfed the school, killing 144 people, including 116 children.

Aberfan and Senghenydd Jason Whittle
Aberfan and Senghenydd
by Jason Whittle

4.2 out of 5

Language : English
File size : 1461 KB
Text-to-Speech : Enabled
Screen Reader : Supported
Enhanced typesetting : Enabled
Word Wise : Enabled
Print length : 21 pages

The Aberfan disaster was one of the most devastating industrial accidents in British history. It shocked the nation and led to a public inquiry into the causes of the disaster. The inquiry found that the National Coal Board, which was responsible for the colliery, had been negligent in its management of the spoil tip. The inquiry also found that the local council had failed to properly inspect the tip and had not taken any action to prevent the collapse.

In the aftermath of the disaster, the government introduced new safety regulations for colliery spoil tips. The regulations required tips to be built on stable foundations and to be regularly inspected. The government also set up a fund to provide compensation to the victims of the disaster and their families.

The Aberfan disaster had a profound impact on Welsh society. It led to a loss of faith in the mining industry and in the government's ability to protect its citizens. The disaster also raised questions about the safety of other colliery spoil tips in Wales.

Senghenydd

On October 14, 1913, an underground explosion at the Senghenydd Colliery in South Wales killed 439 miners. The explosion was caused by a spark that ignited a pocket of methane gas. The blast ripped through the mine, causing the roof to collapse and trapping the miners underground.

The Senghenydd disaster was one of the worst mining disasters in British history. It was the deadliest mining disaster in the United Kingdom until the Aberfan disaster in 1966. The disaster shocked the nation and led to a public inquiry into the causes of the explosion.

The inquiry found that the colliery management had been negligent in its safety procedures. The inquiry also found that the government's mines inspectorate had failed to properly inspect the mine and had not taken any action to prevent the explosion.

In the aftermath of the disaster, the government introduced new safety regulations for coal mines. The regulations required mines to be properly ventilated and to have adequate fire-fighting equipment. The government also set up a fund to provide compensation to the victims of the disaster and their families.

The Senghenydd disaster had a profound impact on Welsh society. It led to a loss of faith in the mining industry and in the government's ability to protect its citizens. The disaster also raised questions about the safety of other coal mines in Wales.

The Aberfan and Senghenydd disasters were two of the most devastating industrial accidents in Welsh history. Both disasters had a profound impact on Welsh society and led to significant changes in safety regulations in the mining industry. The disasters also raised questions about the government's ability to protect its citizens and the safety of other industrial facilities in Wales.

Aberfan and Senghenydd Jason Whittle
Aberfan and Senghenydd
by Jason Whittle

4.2 out of 5

Language : English
File size : 1461 KB
Text-to-Speech : Enabled
Screen Reader : Supported
Enhanced typesetting : Enabled
Word Wise : Enabled
Print length : 21 pages
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The book was found!
Aberfan and Senghenydd Jason Whittle
Aberfan and Senghenydd
by Jason Whittle

4.2 out of 5

Language : English
File size : 1461 KB
Text-to-Speech : Enabled
Screen Reader : Supported
Enhanced typesetting : Enabled
Word Wise : Enabled
Print length : 21 pages
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